Friday, September 21, 2007

Ruins - Tzomborgha



I was able to purchase this 2002 release, as well as the singles compilation, from Tatsuya Yoshida himself before his show in Detroit a few years back. It's quite different from older Ruins' material, at least from a distortional standpoint, but maintains the usual stop-and-go complexity heard on every release. This may not be the best Ruins album to begin with for first time listeners, but this is indeed some of the bands best work. "Wanzhenvergg", "Gurthemvhail", and "Chittam Irangaayo" continuously blow my tits off every listen. Crank it up as loud as possible.

- Dan

Download Tzomborgha

3 comments:

Nyarlathotep said...

Awesome, I am glad that somebody has a way to actually hear this kind of music. Ruins and Merzbow are some of the most fantastically bizarre bands I have ever had the pleasure of listening to. If I wouldn't have taken the leap of listening to Sunn O))) and consequentially Boris, I don't think I would have ever heard this obscure Japanese... Deconstructionist-technical-acid-experimental-jazz? I don't know, reminds me of the Mars Volta, except for I am having a massive stroke while listening to it. Whatever it is, it's blowing my mind! Thank you so much for posting this!

Grisly Gristle said...

I think in some ways this is the apex of Ruins recordings. More complex is not always better, but the feeling of intentioned sequencing and the airy production qualities of this album serve the music in a way that allows the spirit of the music to come through more than on "Pallaschtom" or "Vrresto," where I feel that complexity-for-complexity's sake sometimes took over. "Chittam Irangaayo" is a composition by Indian violinist L. Shankar, and the version here is amazing. The title track is really unbelievable too! Thank you for bringing attention to this music.

Grisly Gristle said...

I think in some ways this is the apex of Ruins recordings. More complex is not always better, but the feeling of intentioned sequencing and the airy production qualities of this album serve the music in a way that allows the spirit of the music to come through more than on "Pallaschtom" or "Vrresto," where I feel that complexity-for-complexity's sake sometimes took over. "Chittam Irangaayo" is a composition by Indian violinist L. Shankar, and the version here is amazing. The title track is really unbelievable too! Thank you for bringing attention to this music.